E-ISSN: 2791-8823
Volume : 13 Issue : 4 Year : 2021
Forms

Abstracting & Indexing
Turkish Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Society
Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology
Bisphenol A Exposure in Exclusively Breastfed Infants and Lactating Women: An Observational Cross-sectional Study [J Clin Res Pediatr Endocrinol]
J Clin Res Pediatr Endocrinol. 2021; 13(4): 375-383 | DOI: 10.4274/jcrpe.galenos.2020.2021.0305

Bisphenol A Exposure in Exclusively Breastfed Infants and Lactating Women: An Observational Cross-sectional Study

Seda Çiftçi1, Sıddıka Songül Yalçın2, Gülhan Samur3
1İzmir Democracy University Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, İzmir, Turkey
2Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Ankara, Turkey
3Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Ankara, Turkey

Objective: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a known endocrine disruptor and free BPA will interact with estrogen. BPA is also fat soluble and will therefore contaminate breast milk. The European Food Safety Authority has set a limit for temporary tolerable daily intake of 4 µg/kg body weight/day in breastfeeding infants. The aim of this study was to measure human milk BPA concentrations in Turkish women and thus exclusively breastfed infants’ exposure to BPA.
Methods: Healthy, postnatal, exclusively breastfeeding women were recruited and breast milk samples were collected. Free BPA concentration was analyzed in the milk samples using competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Participants’ demographic characteristics and nutritional habits were investigated through face-to-face interviews using a detailed questionnaire.
Results: Eighty women participated. Median milk free BPA level was 0.63 µg/L. There was no statistically significant association between maternal body mass index, birth type, parity, infant birth week, infant birth weight, and human milk BPA concentration. Nevertheless, there was a significant association between human milk BPA level and consumption of fast-food and carbonated drinks (p=0.022 and p=0.018, respectively). Exclusively breastfed infants’ mean BPA exposure was 0.0099±0.0079 µg/kg bw/day. There was a moderate negative significant correlation between infant BPA exposure and infant current body weight (r=0.327, p=0.003).
Conclusion: BPA exposure in exclusively breastfed infants was within accepted limits and the current dietary exposure level of infants in this cohort was safe.


Seda Çiftçi, Sıddıka Songül Yalçın, Gülhan Samur. Bisphenol A Exposure in Exclusively Breastfed Infants and Lactating Women: An Observational Cross-sectional Study. J Clin Res Pediatr Endocrinol. 2021; 13(4): 375-383
Manuscript Language: English
LookUs & Online Makale